Recent Changes

Wednesday, December 14

  1. page home edited ... Welcome to the workspace for the New Media Consortium's Horizon.Library project. This is a pla…
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    Welcome to the workspace for the New Media Consortium's Horizon.Library project. This is a place where the members of the Horizon.Library Panel of Experts manage the process of researching, discussing, and ultimately, selecting the topics for the inaugural NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition. The annual report is published by the The New Media Consortium in collaboration with University of Applied Sciences (HTW) Chur, Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) Hannover, and ETH-Bibliothek Zurich, with the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) as our key dissemination partner.
    The NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition applies the process developed for the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project with a focus on emerging technologies for libraries. Members of the library community are encouraged to follow the Panel of Expert's progress as the discussion unfolds and to use the wiki as a resource and reference tool.
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    be released inon March 23, 2017 at
    What's New?
    Voting is complete and the final results will be announced soon!
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  2. page home edited ... The report is planned to be released in March 2017 at the ACRL National Conference. What's Ne…
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    The report is planned to be released in March 2017 at the ACRL National Conference.
    What's New?
    Voting is complete and the final results will be announced soon!
    The expert panel just finished the data collection phase where they answered the research questions. Voting will open soon!
    The wiki will open on October 4th! Welcome Panel of Experts -- if you are new to using wikis, see our Getting Started guide.
    Check it out! The NMC Horizon Report > 2015 Library Edition, set a high benchmark for the 2017 Library report.
    Project Timeline
    {timeline-3-research-questions.gif}{timeline-6-second-rankings.gif}
    Review the timeline...
    Introduction to the Horizon Project Wiki
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Monday, November 21

  1. page Panel of Experts edited 2016 2016-17 Library Edition Leadership Team: Samantha Adams Becker, Co-Principal Investigat…

    20162016-17 Library Edition
    Leadership Team:
    Samantha Adams Becker, Co-Principal Investigator
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  2. page Panel of Experts edited ... Ryan Wetzel Pennsylvania State University USA Lizabeth Wilson University of Washington …
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    Ryan Wetzel
    Pennsylvania State University
    USA
    Lizabeth Wilson
    University of Washington

    USA
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Monday, November 14

  1. page Trends edited ... Discovering Emerging Educational Technologies I am not sure what others think but I added thi…
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    Discovering Emerging Educational Technologies
    I am not sure what others think but I added this category/topic as a broad catch-all for all the types of educational technologies that academic libraries could be using or promoting to faculty over the next five years. A few of things being discussed on the wiki could fall under the edtech umbrella, such as learning analytics or adaptive learning technology, but perhaps there are many other technologies that would fit under the umbrella (e.g., LMS). Edtech is a $2 billion a year industry, much of it being spent in K-12, but higher ed is certainly a big market for the Edtech companies. As library educators, librarians would need to be skilled and adept at identifying appropriate Edtech, knowing how to use it and sharing what they know with faculty. Academic librarians wouldn't be replacing the instructional designers, but I think there is plenty of opportunity in higher ed for librarians to share their knowledge about Edtech.bells Nov 10, 2016 Agreed. In fact, there is a rise of libraries hiring ed. tech. staff and/or instructional designers to help develop robust services and offerings that effectively integrate appropriate technology and sound pedagogy. MarwinBritto Nov 13, 2016
    Some of this depends, also, on where EdTech or Academic Technology sits within the Library or IT organizations. Where EdTech is separate from the Library, I think we see strategic hirings of subject liaisons who also have pedagogical training to work closely with Instructional Designers and centers for teaching and learning. anthony.helm Nov 14, 2016
    Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record
    Once limited to print-based journals and monographic series, scholarly communications now reside in networked environments and can be accessed through an expansive array of publishing platforms. The Internet is disrupting the traditional system of scholarship, which was founded on physical printing and distribution processes. Now scholarly records can be published as soon as peer review has taken place, allowing communication to happen more frequently and publicly. No longer limited to text-based products, scholarly work can include research datasets, interactive programs, complex visualizations, and other non-final outputs, as well as web-based exchanges such as blogging. There are profound implications for academic and research libraries, especially those that are seeking alternative routes to standard publishing venues, which are often expensive for disseminating scientific knowledge. As different types and methods of scholarly communication are becoming more prevalent on the web, librarians will be expected to stay up-to-date on the legitimacy of these innovative approaches and their impact in the greater research community.
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    Many people do not want to wait for an interlibrary loan or even to make the trip to the physical library. They want their information and media when and where they want it (which is oftentimes on-the-go) and will oftentimes settle for less than perfect resources if it means convenience. Many libraries are responding by providing eBooks, audiobooks, videos, etc. through services such as Overdrive, EBL, and more. I think that we'll see a lot more of this with forward-thinking libraries adopting many of the features of Netflix type services such as online and sharable queues of items with ratings, etc as well as adopting third-party services such as Hoopla which is largely for public libraries right now, but could be adapted for academia as well.
    Mixing two different trends here? One -- "on demand" -- is about mechanisms of acquisition and provisioning ("demand driven acquisitions" another example). The other is about types of media. The key trend is more about the "on demand" nature of provisioning options. wlougee Nov 4, 2016
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    10, 2016bells Nov 14, 2016anthony.helm Nov 14, 2016
    This area has huge repercussions for Library budgets and certainly reflects our changing relationships with media. In the Library, we are responding to the demands of faculty to have media that supports their teaching and research (and of course the research needs of students), and DVDs as tangible, physical objects hit the sweet spot for cost, reusability, and academic fair use. The days of the DVD are numbered though and licensing for digital access comes nowhere close to reasonable yet. Don't get me wrong, the bulk digital collections from Alexander Street Press and others are great and priced well enough, but they just don't offer the majority of titles our faculty want to use in class. Not to mention, each semester faculty request a couple of handfuls of VHS titles that have not been released on DVD or digital. This is a mid-term trend, that will become short-term when DVD releases start to disappear.anthony.helm
    Nov 14,
    Increasing Accessibility of Research Content
    Academic and research libraries are gradually embracing the movement toward openness, a concept that has garnered a meaningful following in the library community among those who wish to eliminate the financial and intellectual barriers that impede the dissemination of scholarly works. There are an increasing number of major funding entities such as the UK’s Research Excellence Framework,the National Science Foundation, and National Institutes of Health that have implemented guidelines requiring researchers to include more comprehensive dissemination plans for their data along with their outputs, expanding access to encompass all scientific outputs. Open access is gaining traction on a global scale, and scholars in some regions of the world, such as Latin America, have been operating under this philosophy for decades. As this trend continues to impact the scholarly community at large, there will be more opportunities for libraries to drive and engage in discussions about efficient ways to make access a priority for the long-term.
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  2. page Trends edited ... Over the past several years, perceptions of online learning have been shifting in its favor as…
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    Over the past several years, perceptions of online learning have been shifting in its favor as more learners and educators see it as a viable alternative to some forms of face-to-face learning. Drawing from best practices in online and face-to-face methods, blended learning is on the rise at universities and colleges with libraries often at the helm of design and digital literacy. The affordances of blended learning offers are now well understood, and its flexibility, ease of access, and the integration of sophisticated multimedia and technologies are high among the list of appeals. One notable form of blended learning is the flipped classroom, a model that rearranges how students spend their time. Rather than the instructor using class time for lectures, students access learning materials from libraries online at home, freeing up class time to allow student-teacher interactions that foster more active learning. franziska.regner Nov 2, 2016 MarwinBritto Nov 13, 2016
    Related to issues around analytics, specifically learning analytics (e.g., Unizin). see http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/10/data-informed-learning-environments wlougee Nov 4, 2016
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    Nov 9, 2016Except perhaps if we are able to contribute to the development of virtual assistants. anthony.helm Nov 14, 2016
    This is a long-term trend, because it reflects the way people live their lives. I think most academic and research libraries already have been offering a variety of services to support this type of learning, and have to continue to do so. That said, increased attention to student privacy and building supportive communities in blended learning environments are critical for higher education, and an area in which libraries could increase leadership.mheller1 Nov 10, 2016 vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    Long term. I mentioned this in Q1 - libraries should be actively moving info lit instruction online to meet the needs of students who rarely if ever come to campus. Need to consider this more but I feel the word blended does have as much meaning these days. mstephens7 Nov 11, 2016
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    liusq Nov 13, 2016Long term trend. Many academic libraries have already offered hybrid learning solutions, and they will continue to all kinds of blended learning definitely.
    On a related note, blended and online learning has been on the rise as an opportunity to extend the episodic face-to-face information literacy sessions. With free video capture tools ideal for creating tutorials, like jing, it has become fairly easy for academic and research libraries to provide a series of information literacy tutorials in blended and/or online format to complement face-to-face offerings. MarwinBritto Nov 13, 2016 FYI - Jing was retired many years ago. There are other tools out there that have replaced it, though more costly, more feature rich, and with steeper learning curves. vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
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    Nov 13, 2016Yes, but what are we seeing in terms of the effect/benefit? How often are they called upon? This is an area that will require some meaningful assessment. anthony.helm Nov 14, 2016
    Continual Progress in Technology, Standards, and Infrastructure
    A recent survey of US academic library directors by Ithaka S + R revealed that libraries are shifting focus from building local print collections to providing remotely accessed online resources and guiding students and researchers through new discovery services. Indeed, a large majority of respondents believe that the importance of building local print collections has declined since the last survey was conducted in 2010. With the transition from physical resources to electronic resources, and the need for new services to support them, libraries are required to frequently assess the state of their operations. A number of trends are driving this focus, including the proliferation of mobile devices, the move towards data resources as part of infrastructure, including changes in identity management, and the increasing importance of cross-institutional systems, such as web-scale discovery and resource sharing, cloud computing, and distributed storage.
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    Nov 4, 2016anthony.helm Nov 14, 2016
    This seems overly broad. Of course technology and infrastructure is changing. They always do! More definition is needed to identify the discreet trend under discussion here. Are we talking about the shift away from local collection building? The move to improved remote access? mcalter Nov 6, 2016 I agree with this point, and I would add that there are some mid-term trends for building services and reducing infrastructure as more and more is hosted and managed off-site within a larger long-term trend.mheller1 Nov 10, 2016
    The shift to hybrid collections (print and digital) and preference for digital in collection development is not a new trend, it's definitely business as usual for the majority of research and academic libraries [[user:mylee.joseph|1478656394]liusq Nov 13, 2016I agree with this point.
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    Technology, standards and infrastructure are always changing as usual, this is not a new trend perhaps.
    I have seen a trend in figuring out ways to make collections still browsable as more electronic collections are purchased. vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    While we are certainly seeing a lot of shared physical collections through Cross-Institution Collaboration (see below), sharing digital collections becomes a lot harder, as many of them are licensed/leased and not owned, and the content owners/publishers are in a fight for their own profits.anthony.helm Nov 14, 2016
    Cross-Institution Collaboration
    Collective action among libraries is growing in importance for the future of academic and research libraries. More and more, libraries are joining consortia — associations of two or more organizations — to combine resources or to align themselves strategically with innovation in higher education. Today’s global environment is allowing libraries to unite across international borders and work toward common goals concerning technology, research, or shared values. Support behind technology-enabled learning has reinforced the trend toward open communities and consortia, as library leaders and educators recognize collective action as a sustainable method of supporting upgrades in technological infrastructure and IT services, too.
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  3. page Trends edited ... Many thought leaders have long believed that academics and research can play a major role in t…
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    Many thought leaders have long believed that academics and research can play a major role in the growth of national economies. In order to breed innovation and adapt to economic needs, libraries must be structured in ways that allow for flexibility, and spur creativity and entrepreneurial thinking. Library leadership and services design could even benefit from agile startup models. Leaders are working to develop new approaches and programs based on these models that stimulate top-down change and can be implemented across a broad range of institutional settings. In the business realm, the Lean Startup movement uses technology as a catalyst for promoting a culture of innovation in a more widespread, cost-effective manner, and provides compelling models for libraries leaders to consider. franziska.regner Nov 2, 2016
    I think there are a lot of interests in this, but the tolerance for risks/failure seems to be still high at academic libraries particularly large ones. Higher ed institutions are under pressure to innovate as much as their libraries, however. So the change may come from the academic administration from the top down to libraries. bohyun.kim Oct 31, 2016
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    Nov 13, 2016Referenced this on the Challenges section. anthony.helm Nov 14, 2016
    This is an organizational issue, but not a driver trend? Libraries serve critical role as catalyst through the assets they provision and integrate into workflows. wlougee Nov 4, 2016
    This is a trend that impacts the whole of higher education, not just libraries. The move towards the innovation culture means changes for the academic infrastructure as well. mcalter Nov 6, 2016
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  4. page Trends edited ... Most libraries act as organisations where administrative leadership is the main culture to del…
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    Most libraries act as organisations where administrative leadership is the main culture to deliver reliable and trusted services. To innovate, adaptive leadership is more appropriate. A two speed process could support the innovation of services (thorough planning, design and development) and innovation of new ideas through proof of concepts and pilots. This kind of innovation could benefit from an agile approach. Laurents.Sesink Nov 13, 2016 Totally agree about libraries needing to adopt more agile practices (instead of more traditional waterfall approaches) to research, learning, and finding new ways to innovate. vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    liusq Nov 13, 2016We have paid more attention to innovation, however real innovation is not easy. Also, I agree with the point above that it is not the issues for libraries only, it is for the whole of higher education. It is a mid-term trend at most.
    (Innovation) Strategies - Strategy building for libraries is a key challenge in times of dynamic changes. franziska.regner Nov 11, 2016
    Brian Matthews has written some inspired pieces on innovation. Libraries face the challenge of understanding how to actualize philosophical concepts on innovation and leverage specific team structures that separately focus on innovative services and sustaining services. tchaffin Nov 11, 2016 And how do we manage innovation and encourage it? This is part of the Creative Classroom model for learning and I believe it applies well here. This one and the one below strike deep chords with me and go beyond some of the more typical above. mstephens7 Nov 12, 2016vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    Project management is a key competence in libraries. Innovation management is new but necessary to think about and build strategies to deal with continues change. Laurents.Sesink Nov 13, 2016
    Libraries' ability both to innovate, and to simply look at challenges from different perspectives and to partner with other professions, are critical to libraries moving forward successfully in the next decade. In his recent book Ron Jantz focuses on creativity and innovation models and strategies for research libraries:
    Ronald C. Jantz. Managing Creativity: The Innovative Research Library. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2016 (Publications in Librarianship; no. 70). 185p. College & Research Libraries recently reviewed the book http://crl.acrl.org/content/77/5/669.full.pdf. sandore Nov 13, 2016
    liusq Nov 13, 2016Strategy building come first before all libary operations. Solvable challenge.
    [Editor's Note: This discussion was added here from RQ4.]

    Blended Learning Designs
    Over the past several years, perceptions of online learning have been shifting in its favor as more learners and educators see it as a viable alternative to some forms of face-to-face learning. Drawing from best practices in online and face-to-face methods, blended learning is on the rise at universities and colleges with libraries often at the helm of design and digital literacy. The affordances of blended learning offers are now well understood, and its flexibility, ease of access, and the integration of sophisticated multimedia and technologies are high among the list of appeals. One notable form of blended learning is the flipped classroom, a model that rearranges how students spend their time. Rather than the instructor using class time for lectures, students access learning materials from libraries online at home, freeing up class time to allow student-teacher interactions that foster more active learning. franziska.regner Nov 2, 2016 MarwinBritto Nov 13, 2016
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  5. page Preservation and Conservation Technologies edited ... liusq Nov 12, 2016Digital preservation is increasingly becoming the important part work of lib…
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    liusq Nov 12, 2016Digital preservation is increasingly becoming the important part work of libraries.
    As is often the case, we are working to build the repositories that future generations of academics will rely on for research. The better job we do with these technologies, the more likely we are are also ensuring our value in years to come.anthony.helm Nov 13, 2016
    Digital preservation - Long term digital preservation of collections and user created content (eg. comments on blogs) present huge challenges to libraries. So much public discourse takes place in these online spaces and researchers and historians will need access to the "whole" conversation. mylee.joseph Nov 10, 2016
    I'm glad you scoped this to the need to discuss this with historians and other researchers, since digital preservation is, in a technical sense, a solved or at least solvable problem these days. Narrower the scope even a bit further, I think we are about to enter a critical phase related to the concept of 'presentism' in history, i.e.- the notion that one cannot 'do' history on current events, but that a certain period of time must pass before it becomes a research-worthy topic. We are now entering a phase where even under this notion, the early Web are now qualifies for historical study, but historians are going to have serious issues accessing the record of that time since so much was online and ephemeral. Web archiving is a challenge--not technical, for the most part--that we are just beginning to address seriously in libraries. askeyd Nov 11, 2016 rudolf.mumenthaler Nov 13, 2016vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    Libraries have over hundreds years of experience in acquiring, cataloguing and making available archives of university professors, correspondence, lecture notes, dissertations, etcetera, mostly written and printed on paper. The digital turn however, forces us to rethink our strategies, not only to meet our longstanding obligations to the research community but also to venture into new possibilities for collaboration. The preservation of academic heritage is nog only related to research information, publications and research data. It is also about websites, e-mails and social media.In order to adequately cope with this born digital material, we need to formulate policy, create an infrastructure and offer training and support. A difficult challenge Laurents.Sesink Nov 13, 2016
    liusq Nov 13, 2016Digital preservation of print collections have been concerend for a while, Other network-based resources should be considered too, but it is hard to decide dimensions of preservation because network-based resources are too many. [Editors' Note: This discussion was added here from RQ4.]

    (4) Do you have or know of a project working in this area?
    wlougee Oct 25, 2016 University of MN is implementing Rosetta. Will preserve resources in multiple Libraries repositories, MN Digital Library (also hub for DPLA, covering 170 other institutions).
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  6. page Challenges edited ... There is a need for LIS professionals to generate new knowledge in the form of research and to…
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    There is a need for LIS professionals to generate new knowledge in the form of research and to be supported in the endeavor. I have played a part in an immersive learning experience—the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) - at Loyola Marymount. My colleague from the School of Information, Dr. Lili Luo, and Greg Guest, a cultural anthropologist, designed the research skills–focused curriculum and served as lead instructors for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)–funded program. For nine days in the summer the selected participants, IRDL Scholars, live and breathe all aspects of generating new knowledge for the profession.This prepares them for active partnering with other librarians, faculty and students to pursue research projects. The "sufficient training" mentioned above in many cases does not include methodologies, etc. More here: http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2016/08/opinion/michael-stephens/the-research-journey-office-hours/ mstephens7 Nov 13, 2016 sandore Nov 13, 2016 vacekrae Nov 13, 2016bells Nov 14, 2016
    liusq Nov 13, 2016New digital environment and dynamic users challenge the capabilites of librarians, we need to keep learning. This is solvable change.
    (Innovation) Strategies
    Strategy building for libraries is a key challenge in times of dynamic changes. franziska.regner Nov 11, 2016
    Brian Matthews has written some inspired pieces on innovation. Libraries face the challenge of understanding how to actualize philosophical concepts on innovation and leverage specific team structures that separately focus on innovative services and sustaining services. tchaffin Nov 11, 2016 And how do we manage innovation and encourage it? This is part of the Creative Classroom model for learning and I believe it applies well here. This one and the one below strike deep chords with me and go beyond some of the more typical above. mstephens7 Nov 12, 2016vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    Project management is a key competence in libraries. Innovation management is new but necessary to think about and build strategies to deal with continues change. Laurents.Sesink Nov 13, 2016
    Libraries' ability both to innovate, and to simply look at challenges from different perspectives and to partner with other professions, are critical to libraries moving forward successfully in the next decade. In his recent book Ron Jantz focuses on creativity and innovation models and strategies for research libraries:
    Ronald C. Jantz. Managing Creativity: The Innovative Research Library. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2016 (Publications in Librarianship; no. 70). 185p. College & Research Libraries recently reviewed the book http://crl.acrl.org/content/77/5/669.full.pdf. sandore Nov 13, 2016
    liusq Nov 13, 2016Strategy building come first before all libary operations. Solvable challenge.
    Reimagining
    Reimagining the library (librarian?)
    I'm
    - I'm often struck
    Cannot agree strongly enough that changing this perception on our campuses is a pressing and urgent challenge. We are not getting through to many key decision makers. askeyd Nov 11, 2016 mstephens7 Nov 12, 2016 erik.stattin Nov 13, 2016vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    One of my mantras - let's stop being gatekeepers and start being gate openers. Gate keeper harkens back to our traditional role as content provider. Yes, that will continue to be critical to the development of the library but we need to reimagine the library and librarians as relationship builders to help their community members to solve their information challenges (libraries as the solutions place?}bells Nov 13, 2016
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    Libraries have over hundreds years of experience in acquiring, cataloguing and making available archives of university professors, correspondence, lecture notes, dissertations, etcetera, mostly written and printed on paper. The digital turn however, forces us to rethink our strategies, not only to meet our longstanding obligations to the research community but also to venture into new possibilities for collaboration. The preservation of academic heritage is nog only related to research information, publications and research data. It is also about websites, e-mails and social media.In order to adequately cope with this born digital material, we need to formulate policy, create an infrastructure and offer training and support. A difficult challenge Laurents.Sesink Nov 13, 2016
    liusq Nov 13, 2016Digital preservation of print collections have been concerend for a while, Other network-based resources should be considered too, but it is hard to decide dimensions of preservation because network-based resources are too many. [Editors' Note: More great points on this topic! This fits in naturally with the existing RQ1 topic "Preservation and Conservation Technologies" and will be added to that discussion accordingly.]
    Combined with Existing RQ3 Trends
    (Innovation) Strategies
    Strategy building for libraries is a key challenge in times of dynamic changes. franziska.regner Nov 11, 2016
    Brian Matthews has written some inspired pieces on innovation. Libraries face the challenge of understanding how to actualize philosophical concepts on innovation and leverage specific team structures that separately focus on innovative services and sustaining services. tchaffin Nov 11, 2016 And how do we manage innovation and encourage it? This is part of the Creative Classroom model for learning and I believe it applies well here. This one and the one below strike deep chords with me and go beyond some of the more typical above. mstephens7 Nov 12, 2016vacekrae Nov 13, 2016
    Project management is a key competence in libraries. Innovation management is new but necessary to think about and build strategies to deal with continues change. Laurents.Sesink Nov 13, 2016
    Libraries' ability both to innovate, and to simply look at challenges from different perspectives and to partner with other professions, are critical to libraries moving forward successfully in the next decade. In his recent book Ron Jantz focuses on creativity and innovation models and strategies for research libraries:
    Ronald C. Jantz. Managing Creativity: The Innovative Research Library. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, 2016 (Publications in Librarianship; no. 70). 185p. College & Research Libraries recently reviewed the book http://crl.acrl.org/content/77/5/669.full.pdf. sandore Nov 13, 2016
    liusq Nov 13, 2016Strategy building come first before all libary operations. Solvable challenge.
    [Editor's Note: While there are always challenges inherent in innovation, this fits in best with existing RQ3 Trend "Advancing Cultures of Innovation" and will be added to that discussion.]

    Other Key Insights
    Making use of co-creation
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