Desktop Research: Developments in Technology

The initial listing of news clippings was culled from a variety of sources we monitor on a regular basis.

We'd love to see your clippings here as well! Please use the edit this page button to add more, or add comments on how or why you think they may or may not be important. As is the convention throughout the Horizon Project Wiki, we ask you to identify items you think are of high interest to us, as I have done here by typing 4 tilde (~) characters -- - Sam Sam Mar 20, 2015 (note - to keep the wiki clean, please put spaces on either side of your marks). This will help us to sift through the articles and determine which ones resonate most strongly with the board as a whole.

Recommended Reading

  • Data, Technology, and the Great Unbundling of Higher Education
    http://er.educause.edu/articles/2015/8/data-technology-and-the-great-unbundling-of-higher-education
  • - g.payne g.payne Oct 9, 2016The "Full stack model" - supporting student needs well beyond the curriculum and graduation - is identified as strategically important for universities, and this brings to libraries the challenge of utilizing technologies in ways that foster this ongoing engagement
  • - susan.gibbons susan.gibbons Oct 10, 2016
  • - vacekrae vacekrae Oct 10, 2016 Students care about affordable, high quality, and engaging experiences that directly align with with potential employers's desired qualifications, and this needs to be done efficiently. Because of online and mobile techs, students can also benefit from adaptive learning techniques.
    - anthony.helm anthony.helm Oct 8, 2016 This author explains what he believes are the changes universities are going to have to make in order to remain relevant in the coming years, highlighting the potential technology has at making higher education more accessible, affordable, and effective. - MarwinBritto MarwinBritto Oct 10, 2016 Agreed. Addresses the "iron triangle" in education of cost, quality and access.
  • - kevin-johnson kevin-johnson Oct 8, 2016Yes, the link of outcomes to a University degree is a step LinkedIn is already taking by offering courses for pay. Khan academy is also now pursuing a grant to do the same - see here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOP0R4GaoeY&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=100%20and%20change%20final%20send&utm_term=All%20Users
  • - mfgreen1 mfgreen1 Oct 10, 2016
  • - mcalter mcalter Oct 13, 2016
  • - bohyun.kim bohyun.kim Oct 18, 2016
  • - kristi-thompson kristi-thompson Oct 21, 2016 Breathless and uncritical neoliberal (essay? article? sequence of vaguely linked sentences?) predicated on the idea that universities are essentially restaurants selling meals for consumers to eat which will magically turn them into appropriate employees for specific companies. (Obviously if that is the goal,higher education's traditional role in producing informed citizens and critical thinkers must be jettisoned!) My favourite bit was the idea that company recruitment and education should be bundled.
  • - mylee.joseph mylee.joseph Oct 26, 2016 There doesn't appear to be any discussion about the impact of the increasingly casualized (part time / non-tenure) employment patterns in academia and the potential impact this has on the amount of learning services support that libraries may be required to provide to students.
  • - sandore sandore Nov 8, 2016
  • Digital Disruption and Academia: Are We Ready for Uber-versities in 10 Years?- lchabot lchabot Oct 9, 2016
    http://www.smh.com.au/national/education/digital-disruption-and-academia-are-we-ready-for-uberversities-in-10-years-20150930-gjxvor.html - andreas.kirstein andreas.kirstein Oct 7, 2016 - franziska.regner franziska.regner Oct 9, 2016 - Laurents.Sesink Laurents.Sesink Oct 10, 2016 - MarwinBritto MarwinBritto Oct 10, 2016
    This article highlights the recent shake-up of the consumer market with the onslaught of innovative and collaborative companies, like Uber, to predict a similar future in higher education. The article argues that now, more than ever, students and teachers are demanding new ways to use developments in digital technology to improve learning settings and outcomes.
  • - kevin-johnson kevin-johnson Oct 8, 2016This is good, but the one above is more thorough.
  • - mcalter mcalter Oct 13, 2016 I second Kevin's comment. This is a nice overview, but with less depth than the earlier piece
  • - kristi-thompson kristi-thompson Oct 21, 2016 Another series of assertions about what students and educators are demanding, backed up not by surveys or other data but by making unsupported statements and analogizing with Uber. I honestly don't see why this is useful. There's no way to evaluate any of the statements in this piece. Either it says things you're already inclined to believe (and so you believe them) or it doesn't.
  • Emerging Tech: Bluetooth Beacons and the DPLA
    http://dltj.org/article/emerging-tech-bluetooth-beacons-and-the-dpla/ - lisabeth.chabot lisabeth.chabot
  • - g.payne g.payne Oct 9, 2016 Cheap beacons can support navigation and links to location specific information in physical environments
    This text from a talk on “Emerging Technologies” describes how institutions are using Bluetooth Beacons, along with a phone and applications written to make use of beacons, TO turn a user's smartphone into a tool for reaching users with information tailored to the library or museum. It also discusses the Digital public Library of America, which aggregates metadata harvested from hubs across the country.
  • - mylee.joseph mylee.joseph Oct 26, 2016 The Measure the Future project is exploring the potential of both Wifi skimming and iBeacons for creating a "Google-Analytics-style dashboard for your library building: number of visits, what patrons browsed, what parts of the library were busy during which parts of the day, and more."
  • - sandore sandore Nov 8, 2016
  • Future Perfect: What will Universities Look Like in 2030?
    https://www.timeshighereducation.com/features/what-will-universities-look-like-in-2030-future-perfect
    - anthony.helm anthony.helm Oct 8, 2016 Several thought leaders discuss the higher education of 2030. Some issues raised include: how universities should be assessed, what the right balance is between technology and human contact and whether job prospects in the academy are likely to get better or worse. - Jill.benn Jill.benn Oct 6, 2016 - lyndamk lyndamk Oct 7, 2016- digicmb digicmb Oct 9, 2016- lchabot lchabot Oct 9, 2016- bells bells Oct 9, 2016 - g.payne g.payne Oct 9, 2016 - erik.stattin erik.stattin Oct 10, 2016 - susan.gibbons susan.gibbons Oct 10, 2016 - MarwinBritto MarwinBritto Oct 10, 2016 - mfgreen1 mfgreen1 Oct 10, 2016 - SueH SueH Oct 11, 2016
  • - mylee.joseph mylee.joseph Oct 26, 2016 Will there be an increase in "independent scholarship" in 2030 ... is that the logical outcome of flipped classroom style learning now? Research libraries may play a bigger part in this than academic libraries - perhaps breaking down some of the traditional boundaries between these silos in the library industry via linked data.
  • - sandore sandore Nov 8, 2016
  • The Internet of Things: Riding the Wave in Higher Education
  • http://er.educause.edu/articles/2016/6/the-internet-of-things-riding-the-wave-in-higher-education
    This is an article in EDUCAUSE Review, July/August 2016 issue, in which 5 experts answer the same group of questions about the IOT. - shorisyl shorisyl Oct 5, 2016 - mstephens7 mstephens7 Oct 7, 2016- digicmb digicmb Oct 9, 2016 - Laurents.Sesink Laurents.Sesink Oct 10, 2016 - vacekrae vacekrae Oct 10, 2016 - MarwinBritto MarwinBritto Oct 10, 2016
  • Libraries have always been about discovery and organising of information, and this encompasses both. Libraries' responsibilities to understand and demonstrate what's possible makes this an emerging technology likely to change how libraries partner with the university community. - g.payne g.payne Oct 9, 2016
  • - mylee.joseph mylee.joseph Oct 26, 2016 Managing the security implications of IOT devices may become a significant risk management activity in libraries of the future as demonstrated by the recent outages and network congestion caused by malware.
  • Machine Learning’s Next Trick Will Transform How Research Is Done
    http://singularityhub.com/2016/05/26/machine-learnings-next-trick-will-transform-how-research-is-done/
    - anthony.helm anthony.helm Oct 8, 2016 Iris AI is a tool that reads scientific papers and learns to determine what is being discussed in the text, in order to lead researchers to relevant papers and new discoveries as they are published. Another machine learning tool, Loom, is able to locate relevant papers that mention specific microRNAs, extract the relevant parts of the paper, and then score the relationship between the microRNA and the specific gene or disease being studied. - andreas.kirstein andreas.kirstein Oct 7, 2016 - Laurents.Sesink Laurents.Sesink Oct 10, 2016 - frank.scholze frank.scholze Oct 17, 2016
  • - kevin-johnson kevin-johnson Oct 9, 2016This is useful and becoming useful, using machine learning (AI) to sift through the explosion of scientific publications. One problem noted is that many papers are not freely accessible online, but locked in databases. - g.payne g.payne Oct 9, 2016
  • - vacekrae vacekrae Oct 10, 2016
  • - erik.stattin erik.stattin Oct 10, 2016 One could certainly add IBM Watson to the list of machine learning tools for research. - susan.gibbons susan.gibbons Oct 10, 2016 IBM Watson for Oncology is a good example of this - mylee.joseph mylee.joseph Oct 26, 2016
  • Not really clear in this piece why such a piece of software is being called AI. In general, AI is overused these days to describe various algorithmic tasks performed by computers. This sounds like fairly standard text analysis, with aspects of word collocation, word frequency, and topic modelling working in tandem to help a researcher do distant reading of a large corpus. It's an exciting prospect, but I think we should be careful about calling such things AI. - askeyd askeyd Oct 18, 2016
  • - kristi-thompson kristi-thompson Oct 21, 2016 Tool that seems like it has the potential to be useful, and a nice approach (though, yes, not "AI"). Not sure about the 10x faster thing as most researchers already have shortcuts they use to zero in on the research most relevant to them. I suspect it's more likely to be supplementary than transformative, at least for the first few generations of development.
  • - sandore sandore Nov 8, 2016

  • NCSU Libraries Demos Virtual Reality Gear for Lending
    https://www.lib.ncsu.edu/news/ncsu-libraries-demos-virtual-reality-gear-for-lending
    The NCSU Libraries is lending out virtual reality gear including the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive VR headsets, and the Microsoft HoloLens augmented reality device so that students and faculty can navigate virtual environments and learn about the range of VR programming software available.- bells bells Oct 9, 2016VR certainly has the capacity to offer a radically different approach to learning
  • - g.payne g.payne Oct 9, 2016 Another example of a library providing technology in a way that lets the university community experience what's possible with virtual reality, thus fostering its exploitation
  • - bohyun.kim bohyun.kim Oct 18, 2016 Tagging here not because this article is particularly informative or interesting but because of the potentially significant impact of VR/MR on education/design/science - see a related reading at http://makezine.com/2016/07/19/rockets-rovers-mixed-reality/
  • Six Trajectories for Digital Technology in Higher Education
    http://er.educause.edu/articles/2015/6/six-trajectories-for-digital-technology-in-higher-education
    - anthony.helm anthony.helm Oct 8, 2016 Taking into account technology’s dynamic characteristics, whether it be a development in speed or capabilities, the author poses six trajectories he believes digital technology are heading to create more personalized learning opportunities within higher ed. - shorisyl shorisyl Oct 5, 2016 - dianeb dianeb Oct 6, 2016
  • The Technology of Higher Education
    https://techcrunch.com/2016/06/28/the-technology-of-higher-education/
    This article lists four ways in which technology is being used to bridge the gap between higher education and the workforce, thus creating “competency marketplaces” that are able to leverage data analytics to match the skills of students to the needs of employers more efficiently.- bells bells Oct 9, 2016- andreas.kirstein andreas.kirstein Oct 7, 2016
  • - vacekrae vacekrae Oct 10, 2016 -This article isn't the first to emphasize the rise of adaptive learning as a potential replacement to deliver the right digital content at the right time to each individual learner. - MarwinBritto MarwinBritto Oct 10, 2016- bohyun.kim bohyun.kim Oct 18, 2016
  • - kristi-thompson kristi-thompson Nov 2, 2016 Yep, that's what we need - competency marketplaces to match skills to employer's specific needs... This statement from the article struck me as at best naive: "The historic disconnect between higher education and the needs of the labor market is a data problem... In the past, data translating the discrete skills or competencies that employers need was not easily available." It's not a data problem, it's a philosophical and goal difference. Most university faculty in my experience are not slavering for data that will allow them to tailor their course on the Western Philosophical Tradition to the current needs of human resources managers at Wells Fargo. At the two-year college or supplementary training level, perhaps, but most faculty (if not administrators) still have the (perhaps also naive) belief that what they are teaching in their 4-year Liberal Arts or Ivy League or state school class is how to learn, how to grow as a person, how to understand society and the humanities' place in it, how to understand the details and philosophical traditions and equations and why of computer science or biology or economics. The problem isn't a data disconnect so much as the fact that the different stakeholders aren't even talking to each other - the data analysts and technologists and job marketplacers are speaking at the post-secondary education / faculty community without bothering to learn their language or consider that they might actually know something about what they are doing (and meanwhile sounding as if their typical vaguely libertarian / futurist / techno-utopian worldview was somehow an essential part of how the technology works). And the faculty / post-secondary educators and theorists are letting it all wash over them and defending their right to do things they way they always have, often without wondering if the technology and new ideas might have something rather vital to offer them (at least if you strip away all the technologist / marketplace philosophy and step back to think about what the tools can actually do).
  • What Artificial Intelligence Could Mean for Education
    http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/03/16/470011574/what-artificial-intelligence-could-mean-for-education
    - anthony.helm anthony.helm Oct 8, 2016 Artificial intelligence (AI) is beginning to make its long awaited debut within the technology industry. Following the recent defeat of the world’s number one Go player against AI software, educators predict the technology will percolate throughout education, working as a tutor by helping students solve problems, work through challenges, and even offer advice. - franziska.regner franziska.regner Oct 4, 2016- bells bells Oct 9, 2016 While I have some concerns about AI it is a rapidly evolving tech that can definitely impact how we teach and learn. Here is more on what I had to say about it - Laurents.Sesink Laurents.Sesink Oct 10, 2016
    http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2016/04/opinion/steven-bell/promise-and-peril-of-ai-for-academic-librarians-from-the-bell-tower/
  • - kevin-johnson kevin-johnson Oct 9, 2016A good connection to the "Machine Learning" article above; this is coming and may help, but the point that human interaction, empathy and story-telling are not likely to be replaced touches on the findings of EdX at Harvard and MIT - MOOCs give students the information they need in a better form to digest, and the classroom becomes a richer, learning and sharing environment that can target hard-to-get concepts.- bohyun.kim bohyun.kim Oct 18, 2016
  • - sandore sandore Nov 8, 2016
  • Ed-Tech's Inequalities
    http://hackeducation.com/2015/04/08/inequalities
  • Discussion of the societal inequity issues that can be compounded or ignored by educational technology adoption. Provides an overview of the various arenas where these inequities may manifest and what the implications mean with respect to student learning/enfranchisement. - shorisyl shorisyl Oct 5, 2016 - franziska.regner franziska.regner Oct 9, 2016 I agree - societal challenges and developments are at least also important. We will discuss it among the challenges. - rudolf.mumenthaler rudolf.mumenthaler Oct 10, 2016 - susan.gibbons susan.gibbons Oct 10, 2016 - vacekrae vacekrae Oct 10, 2016- MarwinBritto MarwinBritto Oct 10, 2016 - mheller1 mheller1 Oct 10, 2016 - mfgreen1 mfgreen1 Oct 10, 2016 Excellent culturally critical corrective to some of the 'uber' and 'linkedin' hype we see in ed tech. - askeyd askeyd Oct 18, 2016- bohyun.kim bohyun.kim Oct 18, 2016 - kristi-thompson kristi-thompson Nov 2, 2016
  • Rescuing Lost History: Using Big Data to Recover Black Women’s Lived Experiences
  • http://insidebigdata.com/2016/09/20/rescuing-lost-history-using-big-data-to-recover-black-womens-lived-experiences/
    - kristi-thompson kristi-thompson Nov 4, 2016 One possibly unexpected example of how Big Data is transforming research outside the usual areas of science and marketing. Many possible roles for academic libraries here.
  • This is an interesting take on digital humanities, with plenty of application for research libraries.
  • Plenty of application for research libraries indeed--in the here and now. - sandore sandore Nov 8, 2016